The Resource Enough : the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it, Juan Williams

Enough : the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it, Juan Williams

Label
Enough : the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it
Title
Enough
Title remainder
the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it
Statement of responsibility
Juan Williams
Title variation
Phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Storyline
Review
  • When Bill Cosby addressed a 50th-anniversary celebration of Brown v. Board of Education , he created a major controversy with seemingly inoffensive counsel ("begin with getting a high school education, not having children until one is twenty-one and married, working hard at any job, and being good parents"). Building from Cosby's speech, NPR/Fox journalist Williams offers his ballast to Cosby's position. Williams starts with the question, "Why are so many black Americans, people born inside the gates of American opportunity, still living as if they were locked out from all America has to offer?" His answers include the debacle of big-city politics under self-serving black politicians; reparations as "a divisive dead-end idea"; the parlous state of city schools "under the alliance between the civil rights leaders and the teachers' unions"; and the transformation of rap from "its willingness to confront establishment and stereotypes" to "America's late-night masturbatory fantasy." A sense of the erosion of "the high moral standing of civil rights" underlies Cosby's anguish and Williams's anger. Politically interested readers of a mildly conservative bent will find this book sheer dynamite. (Aug.) --Staff (Reviewed June 19, 2006) (Publishers Weekly, vol 253, issue 25, p56)
  • On May 17, 2004, the 50th anniversary of the landmark case that integrated schools (Brown v. Board of Education ), actor/comedian Bill Cosby addressed a distinguished group of African Americans at Constitution Hall in Washington, DC. Cosby talked about the state of life in black America, specifically attacking the poor, for which he was widely criticized. He received no support from organizations like the NAACP, National Urban League, or Congressional Black Caucus. In defense of Cosby and following his lead, Williams (Thurgood Marshall ), a senior correspondent for National Public Radio, rails against reparations, black-on-black crime, and demeaning rap and hip-hop videos. He also exposes corrupt politicians like former mayors Sharpe James of Newark, NJ, and Marion Barry of Washington, DC, and flawed activists like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton. Williams then analyzes race and poverty in New Orleans, contending that class rather than racism played a major role in recovery efforts for Katrina Gulf Coast victims. He then concludes by saying that the keys to ending poverty lie with individuals finishing high school, then college, getting a job and keeping it, and finally, getting married and not beginning a family until age 21. Based partly on an interview the author conducted with the comedian, this is a well-researched, insightful, eyeopening report. For an anti-Cosby polemic, see Michael Eric Dyson's Is Cosby Right, or Has the Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind? Essential reading for most collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 4/15/06.]—Ann Burns, --Ann Burns (Reviewed August 15, 2006) (Library Journal, vol 131, issue 13, p110)
  • Black America is being undermined by a depraved popular culture, avers Williams (Eyes on the Prize, 1987, etc.), while its leaders pursue anachronistic, self-serving causes.At a 2004 gala to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, Bill Cosby gave a blistering speech that deplored the black establishment's indifference to the cultural pathologies crippling poor neighborhoods. Cosby was criticized for his remarks, but his thesis is defended here by NPR senior correspondent and Fox News commentator Williams. While taking care not to dismiss the reality of racism in American society, the author echoes Cosby in rejecting racism as an explanation for high levels of out-of-wedlock births, neighborhoods paralyzed by crime and deficiencies in education. The last particularly incenses the author: Brown was about getting access to a decent education, but a substantial number of poor African-Americans, he says, disdain to use that access. Williams assigns part of the blame to nihilism fostered by a thuggish, misogynist music industry. That industry would not be so successful, however, if the black establishment had not abdicated its responsibility to foster healthy cultural norms. Instead, noted African-American leaders occupy their time with projects that are not easily distinguishable from protection rackets (Williams condemns demands for slavery reparations) or in seeking further subsidies for the black middle class. Some African-American politicians, he concludes, rely on a pool of reliably poor people in whose name they can extract endless public funds for programs that they and their cohorts can administer. Williams has particularly harsh words for the maladministration and patronage politics of mayors Sharpe James of Newark and Marion Barry of Washington, D.C. There is also a hair-raising case study of the effort by such notables as Jesse Jackson and Maxine Waters to squelch criticism of poor care at the largely African-American–staffed King/Drew Hospital in Los Angeles. In the author's view, part of the solution would be simply to hold major black institutions to ordinary levels of managerial probity. The greater need is for a culture that promotes the discipline and enterprise that characterized black society at the time of the Brown decision. A formidable polemic: You may reject the conclusion, but you cannot dismiss the argument. (Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
165641
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Williams, Juan
Dewey number
973/.0496073
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • African American leadership
  • African Americans
  • African Americans
  • Racism
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America--and what we can do about it
Label
Enough : the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it, Juan Williams
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
243 pages
Isbn
9780307338235
Lccn
2006002987
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Label
Enough : the phony leaders, dead-end movements, and culture of failure that are undermining Black America-- and what we can do about it, Juan Williams
Publication
Copyright
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
243 pages
Isbn
9780307338235
Lccn
2006002987
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n

Library Locations

    • Bay Shore-Brightwaters Public LibraryBorrow it
      1 South Country Road, Brightwaters, NY, 11718, US
      40.713309 -73.257746
    • Central Islip Public LibraryBorrow it
      33 Hawthorne Avenue, Central Islip, NY, 11722, US
      40.795526 -73.195144
    • Comsewogue Public LibraryBorrow it
      170 Terryville Road, Port Jefferson Station, NY, 11776, US
      40.923668 -73.053316
    • Deer Park Public LibraryBorrow it
      44 Lake Avenue, Deer Park, NY, 11729, US
      40.759847 -73.323106
    • East Hampton LibraryBorrow it
      159 Main Street, East Hampton, NY, 11937, US
      40.958182 -72.191193
    • Elwood Public LibraryBorrow it
      1929 Jericho Tpke, Elwood, NY, 11731, US
      40.838137 -73.3325100434101
    • Hampton Bays Public LibraryBorrow it
      52 Ponquogue Avenue, Hampton Bays, NY, 11946, US
      40.872962 -72.520379
    • Islip Public LibraryBorrow it
      71 Monell Avenue, Islip, NY, 11751, US
      40.724399 -73.2139704002983
    • John Jermain Memorial LibraryBorrow it
      34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, NY, 11963, US
      41.00062 -72.30071
    • Patchogue-Medford LibraryBorrow it
      54-60 E. Main St, Patchogue, NY, 11772, US
      40.76538 -73.013599
    • Rogers Memorial LibraryBorrow it
      91 Coopers Farm Road, Southampton, NY, 11968, US
      40.886297 -72.393263
    • West Babylon Public LibraryBorrow it
      211 Route 109, West Babylon, NY, 11704, US
      40.709044 -73.354079
    • Wyandanch Public LibraryBorrow it
      14 South 20th Street, 11798, NY, 11798, US
      40.74887 -73.364322
Processing Feedback ...