The Resource Pushout : the criminalization of Black girls in schools, Monique W. Morris

Pushout : the criminalization of Black girls in schools, Monique W. Morris

Label
Pushout : the criminalization of Black girls in schools
Title
Pushout
Title remainder
the criminalization of Black girls in schools
Statement of responsibility
Monique W. Morris
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Fifteen-year-old Diamond stopped going to school the day she was expelled for lashing out at peers who constantly harassed and teased her for something everyone on the staff had missed: she was being trafficked for sex. After months on the run, she was arrested and sent to a detention center for violating a court order to attend school. Black girls represent 16 percent of female students but almost half of all girls with a school-related arrest. Pushout exposes a world of confined potential and supports the growing movement to address the policies, practices, and cultural illiteracy that push countless students out of school and into unhealthy, unstable, and often unsafe futures
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • The school-to-prison pipeline has been examined largely for how it affects men, but Morris, cofounder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute, shifts our focus to the deleterious impact on African-American girls in racially isolated, high-poverty, low-performing schools. Morris examines the zero-
			tolerance policies (“the primary driver of an unscrupulous school-based reliance on law enforcement”), coupled with the increased police presence and surveillance tools (e.g., metal detectors and bag check stations) to show their effects on African-American girls. Through the voices of young girls themselves, she conveys their experiences with teachers and staff at school and in the juvenile correction facilities. She is particularly attentive to the sexual exploitation and abuse of girls, including transgender and special-needs girls. Morris’s work, buttressed by appalling statistics and scholarly studies, is supplemented by two useful appendices (“A Q&A for Girls, Parents, Community Members, and Educators,” “Alternatives to Punishment”) and a list of community resources. (Mar.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 01/18/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 03, p)
  • Let's face it—for a large portion of our 18-and-under population, school is not the place they'd choose to be. While most kids do still attend, a number drop out. As Morris (cofounder, National Black Women's Justice Inst.; Black Stats) writes, school can be a hostile environment, especially for black girls, where cultural differences and racial and gender biases can cause other students, teachers, and administrators to misinterpret normal behavior or calls for help as causing trouble. Those students who decide to stop going to class can find themselves immersed in unhealthy practices and situations. African American female dropouts are among the most vulnerable, as they can be led into prostitution, drug addiction, and criminal behavior, and eventually wind up in juvenile facilities where they are exposed to that system's version of education, in which little learning may actually take place. Having had the same experiences as the youth she interviewed for her book, Morris provides sensible solutions to some of the problems she describes, arguing that educators must abandon their stereotypical views of young black women, and instructors at juvenile facilities must want the best for their students. --Terry Christner (Reviewed 03/15/2016) (Library Journal, vol 141, issue 5, p121)
  • A writer and educator explores how various learning environments marginalize black girls and push them away from positive and productive futures. The concept of the "school-to-prison" pipeline has long dominated discourse about the relationship of the education and juvenile justice systems, especially where young people of color are concerned. Morris (Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century, 2014), the co-founder of the National Black Women's Justice Institute, builds on previous work in which she discussed the way that "the ‘pipeline framework' has been largely developed from the conditions and experiences of males." Poverty is one of the most daunting challenges black girls face, and they have a far greater likelihood of incarceration than girls of other races. But even when they do find employment, they earn less than both black and white men. They also live in more violent environments and die of homicide at shockingly high rates and young ages. Rather than help uplift these girls, however, Morris argues that the public school system participates in their further marginalization through zero-tolerance-type discipline policies such as detention, suspension, and expulsion. It also hurts them by reducing black girls to their sexuality and/or understanding them according to race and gender stereotypes that characterize them as loud, aggressive, and disrespectful. So girls are not pushed into jails or the streets to be exploited and abused, schools—including those at juvenile detention centers—must become "bastions of community building, where healing is the center of…pedagogy." The personal stories at the heart of the author's discussion create a compelling study that puts a human face on both suffering and statistics. Combined with the many suggestions she offers throughout the book for creating healthier learning environments for black girls, Morris' book offers both educators and those interested in social justice issues an excellent starting point for much-needed change. A powerful and thought-provoking book of social science.(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10481483
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1972-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Morris, Monique W.
Dewey number
371.829/96073
Index
no index present
LC call number
LC2731
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • African American girls
  • African American girls
  • Discrimination in education
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the criminalization of Black girls in schools
Label
Pushout : the criminalization of Black girls in schools, Monique W. Morris
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
277 pages
Isbn
9781620970942
Lccn
2015038890
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Label
Pushout : the criminalization of Black girls in schools, Monique W. Morris
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
277 pages
Isbn
9781620970942
Lccn
2015038890
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n

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